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oldtech

MK2F cambelt & water pump replacement with photos

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oldtech
Recently changed the cambelt & water pump on my MK2F GT; thought this post might be of use if considering doing the job at home. It would be relatively quick and uninvolved to complete if it weren't for the plastic cambelt covers blocking access on the MK2F, which require main parts to be unbolted from the engine for removal.
Ultimately, much time and scrabbling around on the gravel can be saved if the lower cover is cut away and discarded along with the upper; though the risk of stones and debris being caught in unshielded cam and aux belts is to be considered, and I don't necessarily recommend this. I decided to omit the covers halfway through the job anyway.
The car in question:
post-919454-0-12636800-1449620951_thumb.
Engine:
post-919454-0-54023700-1449621058_thumb.
Drain the coolant from the car.
Unclip the three clips that clamp the airbox halves together.
Undo the jubilee clip at the throttle body elbow and pull the side breather hose away:
post-919454-0-96710900-1449621220_thumb.
Remove the airbox upper half and filter element, and undo the three bolts securing the lower airbox:
post-919454-0-85599400-1449621320_thumb.
post-919454-0-86736500-1449621353_thumb.
post-919454-0-63039100-1449621384_thumb.
Pull the vacuum hose out and unclip the tubes:
post-919454-0-55740700-1449621442_thumb.
Remove the lower half of the airbox and cold air feed.

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oldtech
Unclip the four clips clamping the outer cambelt cover, exposing the belt:
post-919454-0-68567800-1449622244_thumb.
This is an early GT; 108-tooth cambelt with larger, rectangular-shaped teeth.
Might be good at this stage to get a feel for the tension of the belt; mine was a few years past the age limit and just over maximum mileage.
The long length could be twisted this far:
post-919454-0-91816600-1449622328_thumb.
post-919454-0-22934700-1449622353_thumb.
The short length this far:
post-919454-0-79140400-1449622394_thumb.
This is probably slightly too tight for a new belt, though this old one didn't whine nor was the pump noisy.

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oldtech
Handbrake on tight, chock the rear wheels:
post-919454-0-64716300-1449622553_thumb.
Loosen the offside front wheelbolts. Using a rubber jacking 'puck', centre the jack under the TCA mount and jack up slowly, taking care not to snag the TCA on the jack as it drops if possible:
post-919454-0-64101000-1449622616_thumb.
Place a stand under the reinforced section just in from the sill jacking point, using wood to spread the load. Make sure the wood can't slip if it's a block thicker than this:
post-919454-0-59360100-1449622721_thumb.
Let the car down slowly onto the stand and let it settle, allowing the stand to bite properly into the tarmac/concrete. Remove the wheel and place under the sill beside the stand for extra safety.
The access hole in the wing for the aux belt pulley bolts:
post-919454-0-12102300-1449622794_thumb.
The pulley on the other side of the wing, from below:
post-919454-0-47967800-1449622837_thumb.
This pulley must be removed if you want to retain the lower plastic cambelt cover. The pulley is removed; then the lower cover; then the cambelt is free to slide off the crank sprocket.

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oldtech
Ideally, get a set of four replacement pulley bolts rather than re-using the old ones, as the shoulders will likely be rusty, fragile, and deformed or rounded; especially after having removed them with this tool:
post-919454-0-08692300-1449623101_thumb.
Using this extension:
post-919454-0-18505900-1449623164_thumb.
This impact wrench connects straight to the battery and smashes the bolt round, one hit at a time.
The normal hex bit didn't overcome the first seized bolt and so just slipped and rounded the head:
post-919454-0-27445300-1449623247_thumb.
This is potentially not a good position to be in; I've had another pulley (off the car) where the bolts would not break free even with a splined bit. A 'cross' had to be cut into the bolt heads using a craft saw, then squeezed together with a mole wrench to release the shoulders for that one (this wouldn't be easy whilst on the car due to lack of access).
Thankfully, I was able to swap the hex bit with a splined item in this instance and all four bolts undid without fuss using the impact wrench and penetrating fluid. Just make sure to lean into the wrench as it impacts to avoid slipping.
post-919454-0-04326100-1449623541_thumb.
post-919454-0-33947400-1449623566_thumb.

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oldtech
Tap the pulley, alternating from the rear and through the wing hole to free it. I used the jack handle with a hammer:


post-919454-0-11848800-1449623678_thumb.



The pulley probably won't drop out through the gap between the crank bolt and chassis leg, so the engine must be lowered on a jack to give clearance. It might be possible to lever the engine over with a long bar after loosening the mounts a little, letting the pulley just slip through. I didn't try this.


post-919454-0-62438900-1449623837_thumb.


post-919454-0-68887600-1449623861_thumb.















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oldtech

To lower the engine, the forward engine mounting bracket must be removed. To remove the bracket, the alternator must be removed as it obstructs one of the three engine mounting bracket bolts.

Position a jack centrally under the sump, making sure the weight of the engine begins to be supported as the jack is raised. Avoid crushing the sump by spreading the load with wood, and take care not to snag the lambda sensor or any suspension components:
post-919454-0-34161500-1449623995_thumb.
post-919454-0-30581700-1449624018_thumb.
To remove the alternator, I had to raise the engine to get a socket onto its upper pivot bolt, as it is obstructed by the chassis leg. Undo the vertical chassis leg engine mounting bolt and jack the engine up slowly:
post-919454-0-38743200-1449624084_thumb.
At the lower alternator mounting, hold the inner splined nut with an adjustable spanner whilst undoing the outer bolt:
post-919454-0-86645000-1449624142_thumb.
post-919454-0-39869400-1449624174_thumb.

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oldtech
Remove the lower alternator bolt:
post-919454-0-75046200-1449624294_thumb.
Slide the upper alternator pivot bolt out through the gap in the casting on the left..
post-919454-0-17952100-1449624331_thumb.
..exposing the final engine mounting bracket bolt:
post-919454-0-29716300-1449624427_thumb.
post-919454-0-25434100-1449624473_thumb.
Free the engine mounting bracket:
post-919454-0-68083600-1449624511_thumb.
I took the opportunity to convert the rust/corrosion on the anti-roll bar mount:
post-919454-0-30690700-1449624556_thumb.

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oldtech
Lower the engine slowly on the jack, allowing the aux pulley to post through the gap:


post-919454-0-08907300-1449624690_thumb.


post-919454-0-53272400-1449624729_thumb.


Rust-converting the pulley:



post-919454-0-50888000-1449624764_thumb.



If the engine is left supported by the jack for now, it can be raised or lowered to adjust clearance for tools in the following steps.



Undo the two bolts securing the lower cambelt cover:


post-919454-0-32599500-1449624834_thumb.


post-919454-0-53461400-1449624867_thumb.



The lower belt cover removed:


post-919454-0-41288000-1449624913_thumb.












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oldtech
Remove the spark plugs. Using a short extension through the wing hole for better feel, put a socket over the crank bolt and bar the engine over clockwise until the TDC dots line up on the cam sprocket (a plastic arrow on the inner cover) and crank sprocket, if present:
post-919454-0-03265000-1449625111_thumb.
post-919454-0-19338900-1449625157_thumb.
My block didn't appear to have TDC marks by the crank, but there was white paint that had been left from a previous change; I used these as a reference:
post-919454-0-44951800-1449625193_thumb.
post-919454-0-60731500-1449625219_thumb.
The engine might need to be raised again on the jack to line up with the wing hole again for this.

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oldtech
Undo the three bolts that secure the water pump; two above, one below:
post-919454-0-57414300-1449625605_thumb.
post-919454-0-44838300-1449625628_thumb.
Give the pump a tap and it'll come free:
post-919454-0-04513100-1449625694_thumb.
Remove the old cambelt:
post-919454-0-29529900-1449625722_thumb.
The water pump is obstructed by the inner plastic cover surrounding it; the suggested way to remove the water pump would be to first remove the cam sprocket so that the cover can come away; however I read that it could instead be flexed out of the way just enough for the pump to slip out...
post-919454-0-09983000-1449625819_thumb.
post-919454-0-60157800-1449625846_thumb.

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oldtech
But my plastic snapped here anyway. It might be possible but care must be taken as it snaps with no warning! It flexes only so far then just gives way suddenly:


post-919454-0-37154700-1449626345_thumb.


post-919454-0-61340600-1449626431_thumb.



This is the point where I decided to omit the covers for the future as they make the whole job much more involved!



The old pump:


post-919454-0-53517500-1449626453_thumb.



I snapped this small part away too, then removed the embedded washer to re-use with the new pump:


post-919454-0-01555600-1449626486_thumb.


New pump:


post-919454-0-57112400-1449626523_thumb.


post-919454-0-04567900-1449626554_thumb.












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oldtech
New pump and belt on:


post-919454-0-20458300-1449626742_thumb.


post-919454-0-71788700-1449626788_thumb.



All back together:


post-919454-0-88766000-1449626832_thumb.


New aux pulley bolts:


post-919454-0-73317800-1449626857_thumb.



I taped the two vacuum hoses together out of the way of the now-exposed belt.


post-919454-0-73924400-1449626928_thumb.



NOTE: When refitting the aux pulley, make sure the bolts are really tight. I didn't tighten them enough the first time in the picture, and after about 40 miles of driving each bolt came free one by one and was flung off the engine at high speed on a dual carriageway, smashing into the underside.


I thought the first bang might've been a stone but after a couple more I knew something was up! The pulley started grinding and spinning freely on the crank stub, gouging into the chassis leg and block and making an awful sound. I pulled in and took the now-floppy alternator belt off; the only thing I could do was turn around and try and make it home, 15 miles away, and try not to think about the relentless grinding damage now being caused by the freely-spinning loose pulley!


Eventually it was somehow forced off the end of the crank and through the gap onto the road at a busy roundabout, and was then run over by the car behind! Thankfully it caused nothing more than paint scuffing on the chassis leg after all..


I tracked another used pulley down from Germany (the one where I had trouble with the seized bolts); it is bigger and heavier than the original one that was lost, and was attached to a crank sprocket with more teeth from I assume a later MK2F. I needed a new aux belt with this one as the original belt was too small. I also needed to bend the pulley timing post (?) out of the way to fit it.









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oldtech

Also, it might be best to use extensions and bits made for impact wrenches, if they can be bought like impact sockets can be. They are softer and more flexible than normal socket sets, which are more brittle and can shatter suddenly under impact wrench loads. Watch your eyes!

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nige8021

Nice write up, I've pinned it so it won't get lost :)

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1vw2many

I really had no idea how much work was involved and was thinking of doing this myself but after this I think I may leave it for the pro's .. very good detail ..

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kwijibo_coupe

I'd also add that the timing marks are on the Aux pulley not the crank pulley. So ideally you need to get the engine at TDC before removing the aux pulley.

Fantastically detailed write up though. Well done!

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c.w.pritchard

Brilliant piece. Makes me think I could have a go.

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1vw2many

Good luck let us know how you get on ..

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steveo3002

I really had no idea how much work was involved and was thinking of doing this myself but after this I think I may leave it for the pro's .. very good detail ..

mate have a go , as far as cambelts go its an easy one

just make sure you have all the correct tools before steaming in , only stumbling point is if you round off the 6mm hex bolts , so use a proper tool first time

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kwijibo_coupe

I have no idea what a garage would charge to do this, but for the sake of £125 (which I guess wouldn't be far off a garage labour charge) you could buy this set http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bahco-Socket-106-Piece-2-Inch-Drive/dp/B000Y8OFI6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1449759465&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=Bahco+Socket+set&psc=1 Which has everything you need plus loads more for doing this job. The quality is excellent, I've had mine for about 3 years now and still haven't broken anything.

As Steveo says they are a very easy cambelt to do compared to others. Once you have the engine timed up it is little more than unscrewing then tightening nuts and bolts.

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steveo3002

personaly i wouldnt use a large impact gun on the 6mm hex keys either , too much for the small heads

i always seem to get away with hammer in a good quality socket , hammer it so that it seats fully if theres any grime or rust in there , then a sharp jerk on the ratchet cracks em loose , if that ever fails then hammer in a spline or torx bit

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steveo3002

DSC09644.jpg

see the bracket in the middle with the square notch? that the tdc mark you need to refit the pully

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mick1987

good pic an advice mines dye for belts an full service next week do u recommend me changing my water pump with belt even if its ok,

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kwijibo_coupe

I would for all the extra money and time it takes while you're there. Also moving the pump can disturb the old seal which may lead to a coolant leak.

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mick1987

Yeeah think you are right there only 20quid from eurocar parts lolthanks for advice, oh do u know were I can get a chrome pancake air filter for a Webber double choke carb from

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