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zob

Crankshaft pulley removal

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zob

I'm replacing the timing belt and water pump on my MK2F 1.3 Polo and need to remove the crankshaft aux pulley. As expected the pulley bolts have been totally rounded out by a previous owner who then just gave up (The belt may have never been changed.....).

 

How in tarnation do people actually get to these bolts to properly get them out? The inspection hole in the wheel arch isn't big enough to attack them square on. I've jacked the engine down to try and get a clear, square shot at them but can't seem to get it low enough for at least one bolt to be seen below the wheel arch.

 

Am i missing something? Is it the case that you can actually get to them properly through the inspection hole but you have to rotate the crankshaft to move them into view one at a time? Is there also a good trick for locking the crank when cracking the bolts? I tried popping it into gear with a front wheel on the floor but it wasn't as good as having a socket and bar over the crankshaft bolt would be.

 

It also looks like I'm going to have to use torx bits hammered in to the heads to get them out - my Irwin bolt grips wont fit! The collar on the gripper socket doesn't have enough space between the bolt heads and the crankshaft nut+washer. Have people used these successfully before?

 

Looking forward to the moment the first one cracks loose....

 

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dvderlm

Never removed one. When changing Mk2 timing belt it will slide past the aux pulley with a bit of care.

But mk2f has a Supertorque belt with different tooth shape, so maybe that's not possible?

 

Could you wedge something in the flywheel teeth? There's an inspection plate on engine end of gearbox near oil sump.

 

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zob

After a day of puzzling I figured i could get a socket on the crankshaft and a hammered-in star bit with a breaker bar on the end if the engine was jacked down just right. Had to lie down and kick the breaker bar to crack the buggers free! Job done but dear god that was a lot of faffing!

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caretakerplus

When I had the same problem, I managed to drill off the bolt heads, remove the pulley and take out the bolt shanks.

 

Happy Christmas

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GatisGirdenis

Reading these posts about the bolts makes me really glad that I changed the timing belt while the engine was out.

 

The hex bolts were not really an issue at all in that case, but maybe I just got lucky as the threads and the bolt seat had no rust on it at all

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zob

Seems like its a real design flaw, but then again most owners will only ever see the pulley have to come off once or twice. Replacing them for better bolts is definitely a cheap upgrade!

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steveo3002

its when folk with cheap tools ruin the fasteners then the problems start

 

with a decent bit i find leaving it in gear will do , can put some grips on the brake disc to stop it turning , ALWAYS hammer the tool into the hex bolts to make sure theyre seated nice  

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Yeti

I cut the old belt then exercise saintly patience in sliding the new one down between the pulley and the cover. A warning though - don't take this approach if your new years resolution is to stop smoking. 

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