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DjMaC

Rear Wheel bearings!!!

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DjMaC

Hi all, failed MOT on my mk3 coupe this mornin on the rear wheel bearings!

Both sides have major play!

So i was just wanting sum tips on fitting new ones, is there anything i need to look out for?

I do have mechanical experience but i was just making sure!

Cheer's Dan

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polo6n2g40
Hi all, failed MOT on my mk3 coupe this mornin on the rear wheel bearings!

Both sides have major play!

So i was just wanting sum tips on fitting new ones, is there anything i need to look out for?

I do have mechanical experience but i was just making sure!

Cheer's Dan

they are adjustable on the rear, take the cap off the centre of the drum, remove the split pin and nut positioner and gradually tighten the nut ensuring each time the drum still spins freely by hand as not to over tighten.

put it all back together and put the wheel back on but leave it jacked up and with the handbrake off check for play, if you've tightened it enough it should be fine. (it'll pass the mot)

if you take it for a drive they usually hum or drone if they are knackered. however new ones are around £9 per side and are fairly easy to fit with a decent punch and hammer.

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Guest hypojam

Yea probably just need tightening up

I tightened mine up this morning ready for the mot tomorrow, they had a fair bit of play in them, now they dont :D

(I replaced them 2 years ago, 16k miles)

Edited by hypojam

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Yeti

If they've got any more than slight play, I'd replace rather than retighten, especcially if the bearings are of uncertain age, they're £5 - £10 each, depending where you go.

You'll need:

- Jack

- Axle stand (if you're doing things the proper way and staying safe)

- Wheelbrace

- Big flat screwdriver

- 24mm (I think) socket and bar

- Pliers for split pin

- Cleaning rags

- Soft mallet (or a hammer if you're not picky)

- New bearing

- 1 inch Split pin (buy a mixed tin of them from a cheap tool shop)

- New dustcap (optional)

- Grease

If you want to retighten:

Loosen wheel nuts

Jack appropriate wheel

Place axle stand

Remove wheel

Remove dustcap (big flat screwdriver under the lip)

Remove split pin

Remove retainer

****

Tighten hubnut (24mm socket?) until the hub won't turn

Loosen hubnut off 180 degrees

Replace retainer

Renew split pin (unless you're really tight)

Replace dust cover (soft faced mallet)

Replace wheel and lower car

If you're renewing the bearings, where the stars are, you need to:

Remove hubnut

Remove keyed washer

You can take the brake drum off, but I just pull the bearing out with my finger nails

Clean away old grease from all parts, including in the hub

Check the new bearing is the same as the old one

Grease the new bearing well, making sure to keep it clean and work the grease into the rollers

Insert new bearing into hub, slap some more grease around

Insert keyed washer

Finger tighten hubnut and make sure everything's seated right

Tighten hubnut til the brake drum won't turn

Slacken hubnut 180 degrees

I'm the paranoid sort, so I tighten it again til it won't turn, and loosen off 180 degrees again, so make sure it's all seated right

Continue to reassemble as above

It's a bit of a mucky job, you have to be careful not to get anything but grease in the works, but it's not hard (I think I retightened one of Stevie's in about 10 mins last week). If you're a show off like I am, you don't even need to take the wheel off really. :lol:

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DjMaC

Wow good explination!

thanks for the help :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

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kev...

-22mm (I think) socket and bar

its 24mm 8-)

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Yeti

Indeed it is.

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hayesey

but yeti's description only seems to cover replacing the outer bearing roller? There's also an inner bearing to replace which lives on the other side of the drum and you should replace the bearing outer races too. The bearing kits come with inner bearing, outer bearing, new races, new inner plastic cover...

my description:

- remove brake drum as above. If it's tight, use a pointed screwdriver (I ground an old flat blade one to a point) to move the adjuster wedge up inside the drum which loosens the shoes away from the drum. Pull the drum off.

- turn the drum upside down and pull out the plastic inner bearing cover from the middle and then pull out the inner bearing.

- now you need a hammer and a suitable drift (or big flat blade screwdriver will do it too). There are cut outs in the drum casting that allow you to get the drift/screwdriver onto the back of both outer bearing races. A few good smacks with the hammer and the race should start to move out, keep working round it so it comes out straight.

- clean the drum casting where the outer races locate and apply a thin film of grease.

- now use the old races to tap the new ones in, you dont want to directly hit the new races if you can as you run the risk of damaging them. Again, keep tapping around the whole circumference so they go in straight, if one starts going in at an angle then pull it back out and start again, if you keep hitting it in at an angle it'll get stuck and/or bent. This can be a bit fiddly but just keep at it, you'll soon get the hang.

- now grease up the new bearing rollers, put the inner one in, slap more grease on top of it and tap in the new plastic cover.

- while you've got the drum off, you'd be crazy to not give the brake mechanism a good clean and grease up the adjuster wedge area, also apply a bit of grease to the bits of the backplate where the shoes rest against it. Clean out all the old brake dust.

- if you didnt already, clean all the old grease off the stub axle and put new grease on it.

- put the drum back on, put the new outer bearing in with plenty of grease. put the slotted washer on.

- put the hub nut back on, now most people probably have different ways and opinions on how to go about tightening the hub nut. What I do is tighten it by hand and then give it a slight nip with a ratchet so it's just slightly tighter than hand tight. If you tighten it right up you will squash the bearings together and they'll overheat, too loose and they'll wobble about. Either of these can knacker the bearings themselves, the drums and the stub axles.

- then put the nut cover and new split pin in. Tap on the dust covers with a soft mallet. VW bearing kits come with new dust covers but GSF ones don't in my experience. They are normally fine anyway unless someone has mangled them with a hammer.

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polo6n2g40
but yeti's description only seems to cover replacing the outer bearing roller? There's also an inner bearing to replace which lives on the other side of the drum and you should replace the bearing outer races too. The bearing kits come with inner bearing, outer bearing, new races, new inner plastic cover...

my description:

- remove brake drum as above. If it's tight, use a pointed screwdriver (I ground an old flat blade one to a point) to move the adjuster wedge up inside the drum which loosens the shoes away from the drum. Pull the drum off.

- turn the drum upside down and pull out the plastic inner bearing cover from the middle and then pull out the inner bearing.

- now you need a hammer and a suitable drift (or big flat blade screwdriver will do it too). There are cut outs in the drum casting that allow you to get the drift/screwdriver onto the back of both outer bearing races. A few good smacks with the hammer and the race should start to move out, keep working round it so it comes out straight.

- clean the drum casting where the outer races locate and apply a thin film of grease.

- now use the old races to tap the new ones in, you dont want to directly hit the new races if you can as you run the risk of damaging them. Again, keep tapping around the whole circumference so they go in straight, if one starts going in at an angle then pull it back out and start again, if you keep hitting it in at an angle it'll get stuck and/or bent. This can be a bit fiddly but just keep at it, you'll soon get the hang.

- now grease up the new bearing rollers, put the inner one in, slap more grease on top of it and tap in the new plastic cover.

- while you've got the drum off, you'd be crazy to not give the brake mechanism a good clean and grease up the adjuster wedge area, also apply a bit of grease to the bits of the backplate where the shoes rest against it. Clean out all the old brake dust.

- if you didnt already, clean all the old grease off the stub axle and put new grease on it.

- put the drum back on, put the new outer bearing in with plenty of grease. put the slotted washer on.

- put the hub nut back on, now most people probably have different ways and opinions on how to go about tightening the hub nut. What I do is tighten it by hand and then give it a slight nip with a ratchet so it's just slightly tighter than hand tight. If you tighten it right up you will squash the bearings together and they'll overheat, too loose and they'll wobble about. Either of these can knacker the bearings themselves, the drums and the stub axles.

- then put the nut cover and new split pin in. Tap on the dust covers with a soft mallet. VW bearing kits come with new dust covers but GSF ones don't in my experience. They are normally fine anyway unless someone has mangled them with a hammer.

Good wholesome advice, just 1 small note, the bearings will always seat themselves further after a few days - a week of driving and will more than likely need to be retightened at least once if not again 2 weeks to a month later depending on mileage covered and how hard you drive/corner and should be checked every other month or so if you are that bothered. it's suprising how many people drive around with excessive rear wheel bearing play especially as it effects the brake pedal travel too!!

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Yeti

It's all good advice, but to be honest, I've hardly ever known an inner bearing to wear on a mk1-3 polo. Yes, it's good practice to replace the pair, but it's not normally neccessary. You can check them easily enough if you've got the drum off by putting your fingers in and giving them a spin to see if they feel rough.

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DjMaC

Fitted the bearings!

Was alot esier than i expected!

Just got to do the snapped handbrake cable now lol!

Cheer's For the help guys!!!

Dan

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aroncmc22

A mod needs to pin this thread me thinks :-) Good work guys

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sparky123

this was an easy guide cheers :)

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b3lly44

What about the front? Is it the same minus the drum bit?

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Cymro
What about the front? Is it the same minus the drum bit?

The whole strut needs removing and the old bearings pressed out and the new ones pressed in. Can be done at home far easier if you have access to a hydraulic press.

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