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kiran_182

information - NZ & 3F differences

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kiran_182

There are three types of multipoint injection engine, the G40 is quite easy to spot. This guide is to help you spot a NZ from a GT

This is a GT engine (some light modding)
20141011_113550_zps48b9dc76.jpg

This is a NZ engine 
Photo0469_zpse831aaeb.jpg

The NZ is a multipoint version of the AAV engine which was later developed into the GT (3F). 

• The NZ has the same camshaft as the AAV and was meant to produce the same 55BHP but because of the improved air and fuelling some NZ produce 60+ 
• The NZ throttle body has a throttle open sensor not a position sensor like the GT 
• The NZ has the same gearbox as the AAV
• The NZ has the same compression ratio as the AAV


Electrical items that are different:
• Engine loom
• Ecu
• Distributor
• Ignition coil
• Throttlebody

Electrical items that are the same:
• Airflow meter
• Temperhature senders
• Oil pressure switches
• Fuel injectors
• Idle stabilisation valve

Visible differences:
• The distributor has a vacuum hose connecting it to the throttle body
• The ignition coil has a 5 pin connector on top
• The coolent expansion tank doesn't have a sensor
• The NZ has the AAV exhaust manifold 


The NZ is a capable engine and with the addition of a GT cam has almost identicle power

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Guest KC Malta

Hi.  I am gradually building a 2F GT replica. The car is a 93 and the engine / gearbox originated on a 91.  So far I have been running the engine on the single point injection from the 1050 but it runs out of breath at around 120 kmph.  I've just sourced an NZ and was going to swap the induction system with ECU.  Should I do that or swap the cam, in view of the electrical differences you mention?  I have the wiring loom for the NZ as well as the dash pod.  Thanks

 

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steveo3002

nz +gt cam should be good..might need the fuel uprating to gt spec

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kwijibo_coupe

Swapping the NZ cam into the 1.0 will probably make little to no difference.

However swapping over the MPI stuff and putting in a GT cam if you can find one would make it a lively little motor.

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kiran_182
2 hours ago, Guest KC Malta said:

Hi.  I am gradually building a 2F GT replica. The car is a 93 and the engine / gearbox originated on a 91.  So far I have been running the engine on the single point injection from the 1050 but it runs out of breath at around 120 kmph.  I've just sourced an NZ and was going to swap the induction system with ECU.  Should I do that or swap the cam, in view of the electrical differences you mention?  I have the wiring loom for the NZ as well as the dash pod.  Thanks

 

 

The nz stuff will improve things so its worth doing if you have the bits untill a gt setup comes your way

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karlciarlo

This is KC Malta. I forgot my password and logged in as a guest.  Currently, I am running a 91 1.3 GT engine and gearbox. The induction system only is from a 1.05 as I was advised it would be easier to do than converting the car to carbs.  So my current question is whether to just add the NZ induction to the GT engine or replace the engine with the NZ and keep the GT cam.

 

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MartinB

Not much difference bar the inlet manifold really...

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