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1998 Flash Red 6N 3Dr 1.0 L


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JBrown

This is my 1998 6N Daily Driver.

 

It's a poverty-spec model - Fitted with a 1.0L engine, and three option extras: Passenger Airbag, Driver Airbag, and Power Steering.

 

The car is in good shape mechanically, cosmetically there are some issues, but there is minimal rust. The interior is tidy, and entirely original.

 

I hope to be able to post some more pictures as I modify the car slightly.

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JBrown

Update 1:

 

I have managed to source an original Sony CD Player (CDX-4160RDS) to install in the car which shall be replacing the original Sony Cassette Player (XR-3759).

 

Getting this to work was simple, it only required the re-positioning of some wires in the loom adapter, and an ISO-DIN Aerial adapter (Care of Halfords).

 

I am going to keep the original radio just in case I ever decide to revert the car to its stock form.

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JBrown

Update 2:

 

I decided that my wheels needed respraying as twenty two years had started to take its toll. There were some large rust patches as well as generous coating of surface rust.

 

I started by sanding down the wheels to remove any rust from the wheels, as well as any other imperfections.

 

I then cleaned the wheel with white spirit and masked up the tyres (although not too carefully as it was booked in for a new set the following week).

 

I started by spraying three coats of grey primer, followed by four coats of silver, and finally two coats of clear lacquer.

 

It came out a lot better than I had expected, and will look a lot better once the new tyres are on it.

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  • 3 months later...

Update 3:

 

Having had a look in the launch brochure for the 6N Polo, I decided that I wanted to install Fog Lamps. After some research I found that finding the lower grille piece would be the most difficult. Having failed to find any of these fog lamp grilles, I decided that I would make my own by taking a dremel to a standard lower grille to create the cut-outs for the lamps to sit behind. I managed to find the two fog lamp units new from Hella, the fog lamp switch I managed to find used, the wiring from the front-end connector to the fog lamps themselves were made up from the correct colour wires and a set of plugs collected from the local breakers yard.

 

The end result turned out nicely I think, and adds a little bit of interest to the front end of the car.

 

 

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Update 4:

 

Following a trip to the tyre shop, the car got a new set of Hankook Kinergy Eco 2 tyres on all four corners. The tyre shop informed me that the rear bushes on the lower control arms were completely shot. I was able to find the rear bushes directly from VW at about £45 for the pair. These were pressed into the lower arms by my local garage, and then reinstalled on the car.

 

I also carried out a full service, as well as changing the pads, discs, and brake fluid. The car now runs smoothly and stops well too.

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Update 5:

 

Following the very hot summer this year, I decided that keep-fit windows were impractical so I set about researching the requirements for the conversion from manual to electric.

 

Following some research and lots of help from @Christian6N I determined that this was within my capabilities.

 

I managed to source a switch panel, the switches, the window regulators, the necessary wiring, and some blanking plugs for the old regulator holes in the door card.

 

Once all the parts had arrived, I set about installing the windows.

 

I started by disassembling the dashboard, ready to install the switches. For the live connection I elected to have the system permanently live by connecting a ring connector to the 12v terminal on the dashboard fusebox. I used the earth point on the nearside wing of the car for earthing the windows, then soldered the illumination wire into the existing wire for the heater controls. The switched live & neutral feeds were taken to the door using the standard VW door connector pins. 

 

Following this, I removed the doorcards, insulation and began work removing the manual window regulators. I then installed the electric window regulators, along with their wiring before carrying out a test run. The windows worked first time, so I reassembled the dashboard.

 

This modification has made it far more pleasant to drive in hot weather as I no longer have to reach across the entire car to wind down the passenger window. Its also made ticket barriers significantly less irritating. Also, aside from the plugs used to cover the holes for the original manual window winders, it looks completely stock still.

IMG_20200725_162509.jpg

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